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KRAD's Inaccurate Guide to Life
ramblings from a mad fedora'd writer
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The tradition in my family is that the big family gathering occurred on Christmas Eve. Up until 1976, my grandparents hosted it, but my grandfather died that year. Grandma did that year's Christmas, but she moved back home to Pennsylvania the following year, and the Christmas Eve baton was passed to my parents, and they've been doing Christmas Eve ever since. Every year, we do a group picture, and a few years ago, my parents scanned the old ones in. The 1977 one, unfortunately, doesn't really have me in it, as I'm cut off at the bottom, so I present for your amusement the 1978 one, with little me as a nine-year-old on the bottom.

ChristmasEve1978

Current Mood: nostalgic nostalgic
Current Music: "Werner von Braun" by Tom Lehrer

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boston-charlie

Happy holidays!

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "The First Nowell" by Bob McNally

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...and to all a good night!

ChristmasEve2014

We had a wonderful time with family tonight. Our presents included some maple syrup, some strawberry preserves, some chocolate, a nifty calendar, a new membership in the New York Botanical Garden, and renewed membership with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History. Plus, my new computer and printer/scanner, which I actually got a few months ago.....

Tomorrow we're off to my aunt's house for a smaller Christmas Day celebration. Hope everyone's had a great day!

Current Mood: merry
Current Music: the final episode of Cabin Pressure

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Dukat channels Marshall Applewhite and wants to take the Pah-wraith cult to heaven's gate (ahem). He also tries to get Kira to drink his Kool-Aid. The DS9 Rewatch forms a "Covenant."

An excerpt:
Either way, Dukat is getting everything he wants out of this: Bajorans serving him, Bajorans loving him, and Bajoran women boinking him, with the added bonus of not being answerable to Central Command, the Detapa Council, or the Obsidian Order, just a bunch of beings of pure energy who apparently only talk to him (if they talk at all).

Current Mood: busy busy
Current Music: "Christmas Hymm" by Billy Childs

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The Waverly Consort's performance of one of my favorite Christmas songs, "Riu Riu Chiu."




And because we are inclusive here at KRAD's Inaccurate Guide to Life, here's my favorite Hanukkah song, Tom Lehrer's "Hanukkah in Santa Monica." (Lehrer wrote this because he felt there was a paucity of Hanukkah songs, mostly because the Jewish songwriters were too busy composing Christmas carols....)

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "Hanukkah in Santa Monica" by Tom Lehrer

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Yesterday was a day of shopping -- not because we procrastinated, but because we didn't have the money to shop until I got a check for teaching the afterschool karate program on Monday night. I love not having money. *sigh* Still, it was a fun day. Wrenn got her haircut (part of her Christmas present from my mother), and Vinny at Madora George Michael did her usual superb job. She even pulled a magic act and tied up her hair magnificently:

IMAG4537

After that, we did the shopping, which was tremendous fun. First we went to Dylan's Candy Shop, then to Bryant Park's crafts fair, then to Grand Central both for lunch and their crafts fair, where much browsing and some shopping was done.

En route to Grand Central from Bryant Park, I took this picture of the Chrysler Building in the mist:

IMAG4538


In addition, there's much work to be done. I also spent a lot of time yesterday on two short story rewrites based on editorial notes. Jonathan Maberry had some minor changes to "Streets of Fire" for V-Wars: Night Terrors, and Laura Anne Gilman had some significant edits on "Down to the Waterline," the Cassie Zukav story I sold to Buzzy Mag. The former is done, the latter just needs one final read-through.

Today, I do that read-through, then wrap the gifties, and then it's the usual evening of festivizing at my parents' place with as much of the immediate family as is available -- which this year means the Forebearance, the Godmommy, my twin uncles (and one uncle's girlfriend), and Tina & Neal. None of my cousins, sadly -- they're either too far away or spending time with their significant other's family.

The solstice has come and gone and we're in a time of renewal. I hope that, however you celebrate this time of year (if you do at all) that it is fun and wonderful and nifty and stuff. And may the new year and the longer days bring you joy.

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "O Holy Night" by Bob McNally

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Jethro Tull is not only one of my favorite bands, they've also done a bunch of Christmas-y stuff, and in 2003 they put it all together and added a few more and put out The Jethro Tull Christmas Album. Here are a few of my faves from it....

A live version of "We Five Kings," a jazzy variation on "We Three Kings," one that gives all five members of the band a moment (or two) in the sun:




One of the best things to come out of this album was that this variation on Fauré's "Pavane" became a live standard, not just for Tull concerts, but also for Ian Anderson's concerts with an orchestra. Here's a superb example of the latter, from the Ian Anderson Plays the Orchestral Jethro Tull DVD:




One of the original songs created for the album is "First Snow on Brooklyn," which was covered very nicely by Marc Atkinson (vocals), Simon Scardanelli (guitar), and Robert Webb (piano) for A Christmas Carol Unplugged with Noddy Holder:





Finally, my favorite of the new songs on the album, "Last Man at the Party."

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "Pavane" by Ian Anderson w/orchestra

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*falls over*

So it's been quite a busy few days. Let me explain.

No, is too much. Let me sum up.

Thursday, Tina came into town and we spent the day at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, mostly so she could see the "Death Becomes Her" exhibit, and we checked out two newer ones: "Kimono: A Modern History" (which was very nifty) and "Madame Cézanne" (portraits, sketches, and other drawings of Hortense Fiquet, Cézanne's wife, which showed mostly that she was a very unhappy woman...), as well as the usual pilgrimage to the Astor Court.

IMAG4421


Thursday night, Wrenn and Dale joined me and Tina to see a nifty burlesque show where all the acts were BBC themed. It opened with a riff on a BBC News anchor who reported on her own striptease, then included Top Gear, The Vicar of Dibley, Absolutely Fabulous, Fawlty Towers, and the closing, our friend Miranda Raven doing River Song from Doctor Who.

Before that, we took Tina to Katz's Deli, where she'd never been. So that's off her bucket list....

IMAG4429


Friday, Tina, Wrenn, and I went to the New York Botanical Gardens here in da Bronx to see their Holiday Train Show, which has G-scale trains zipping around New York City landmarks reconstructed out of bark and twigs and other tree-related material. It was some beautiful stuff.

IMAG4474


Friday afternoon, I had to do some karate stuff. The afterschool karate class that I teach on Wednesdays at a local public school is part of a larger afterschool program run by a local company that teaches kids various things (Zumba, hip-hop dancing, Capoeira, karate, arts, crafts, etc.) in the hours between 3 and 6 -- basically giving the kids something to do while the parents are still at work. Friday afternoon, the kids' parents came in for a demonstration of some of the stuff they've learned. It ended with the kids showing off some of the mad karate skillz I've been teaching them. Shihan Paul led the demos, and afterward he told me how impressed he was with how well the kids did. I must admit to being inordinately proud of how the kids performed. Unlike the kids at the dojo, who have chosen to take karate, these kids are doing it because it's part of the program they signed up for. As a result, their focus and discipline isn't 100% -- having said that, they did really well, and I'm really thrilled with them. I'm looking forward to doing more with them in the spring semester.

(The program is expanding to another school, and I'll be doing karate for them, too, on Thursdays. Should be fun, and the extra money will not hurt.....)

Saturday, Wrenn and I drove out to Doylestown, Pennsylvania for the Liars Club Holiday Signing at the magnificent Doylestown Bookshop. Fellow Liars Janice Gable Bashman, Marie Lamba, Merry Jones, Jon McGoran, Kelly Simmons, Keith Strunk, and Dennis Tafoya joined me in scribbling on lots of books from the many genres that we work in.

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As expected, our friend Zan showed up, since we were crashing at her place Saturday night. As totally not expected, our friend Meredith showed up also, having driven up from D.C. to surprise us. So Wrenn and Meredith and Zan sat and babbled while the signing went on, and then we all went to dinner and then back to Zan's to play Cards Against Humanity for hours and hours. (Some of the out-of-context highlights: "I figured the flaccid penises were yours." "I think that's a misuse of 'queefing'." "I knew I didn't play that card, so I knew it was okay, because it meant the Auschwitz card was played by one of the Jews.")

Meredith had intended to drive home Saturday night, but she was having so much fun, she crashed at Zan's, too, and we all went to have breakfast together Sunday morning. It was, all in all, a superb weekend.

After breakfast, we trundled over to Wrenn's father's place. We're not spending Christmas with her family this year, as I want to spend more time with my own family, what with my mother's medical mishegoss, so we made sure to spend some time with her Dad today, since we were in the area. We had a lovely dinner at an Italian place and a good talk about life, the universe, and everything.

Then we came home and are now having a semi-quiet evening. I'm going to do Tuesday's DS9 Rewatch and Wrenn has a rush proofread to do. Cha cha cha.

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "Dargason" from The Christmas Revels

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Nog gets his leg blown off, and a whole lot of people get killed, including Tuco from Breaking Bad and Lennier from Babylon 5. Plus, Rom sings for ABSOLUTELY NO GOOD REASON. The DS9 Rewatch endures "The Siege of AR-558."

An excerpt:
It’s easy to trivialize war, especially in a science fiction show. When most of the battles take place in space, where models and CGI effects shoot fictional ray beams at other models and CGI effects, and the only consequences seem to be exploding consoles and the occasional extra who’s never a person we actually know flying across the bridge, it’s hard to get too worked up about it. Credit to DS9 for this episode, for “The Ship” and “Rocks and Shoals” and “Nor the Battle to the Strong” and “Valiant” and “In the Pale Moonlight” for keeping their eye on the ball: war sucks. Even if it doesn’t kill you, it eats away at you bit by bit.

Current Mood: awake awake
Current Music: "Another Christmas Song" by Jethro Tull

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Kor's back. Martok's pissed. Worf's stuck in the middle. Dax is nostalgic. Quark is a doof. And Davy Crockett's a legend -- maybe. The DS9 Rewatch goes "Once More Unto the Breach."

An excerpt:
J.G. Hertzler has perhaps the hardest job, because he has to act like a total dick to a character we actually like without sacrificing what makes Martok so likeable as well. To his credit, he not only pulls it off, he never once makes us think any more ill of Martok. His righteous anger is completely justified, and I like the fact that it never entirely goes away. Even at the end when he opens the bloodwine and raises a toast to Kor—he can’t bring himself to join Darok, Worf, and the others in singing a song to his victory. The hurt is still too deep.

Current Mood: impressed impressed
Current Music: "The Secret Language of Birds" by Ian Anderson

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Back in 1984, Bob Geldof (prior to then best known as the frontman for the Boomtown Rats, a band best known for their hit "I Don't Like Mondays") gathered a bunch of his fellow British musicians to do a benefit song to raise money for folks starving in Africa. The impromptu group was called Band Aid, and it started a domino effect, leading for to an American counterpart called USA for Africa that did a song called "We are the World" the following year, as well as an all-day two-country concert, LiveAid -- all done to benefit the hungry in Africa. And it all started with this Christmas song.......



Man, dig the 80s hair..............

Current Mood: amused amused
Current Music: "Sweet Dream" by Jethro Tull

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Earlier this year, Silence in the Library did a Kickstarter for a graphic novel adaptation of a Gregory Wilson novel entitled Icarus. Greg's novel is a very nifty speculative fiction piece about an underground world of caves and caverns and volcanoes in which a winged being named Icarus falls from above and into the life of a curmudgeonly prospector named Jellinek. Icarus's arrival sparks a time of great change, and Jellinek gets caught up in it rather against his better judgment.

The novel is being adapted by me and Matt Slay. Matt has done some terrific evocative art already (you can see some of it at the Kickstarter page), and I've been having fun adapting Greg's fascinating world into a graphic novel script. I'm about 2/3 of the way through it, and I'm hoping to finish it before Christmas.

The 100-page graphic novel is being put together by the fine folks at Comic Mix for SITL, and it should be out some time in 2015.

(This is the graphic novel project I've been working on since October....)

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Riu Riu Chiu" by the Waverly Consort

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On Saturday the 20th of December, I'll be part of the Liars Club Holiday Book Signing at the Doylestown Bookshop at 16 South Main Street in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Starting at 2pm, I'll be there scribbling on books alongside fellow mendicants Janice Gable Bashman, Merry Jones, Marie Lamba, Jon McGoran, Kelly Simmons, Keith Strunk, and Dennis Tafoya.

The shop should have copies of Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution and The Klingon Art of War (at the very least). So come on by!

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "Ring Out, Solstice Bells" by Jethro Tull

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Bob Rivers's hysterical holiday-themed parody of "Iron Man."

"Ho ho ho ho ho ho ho!"

Current Mood: amused amused
Current Music: "The Twelve Days of Christmas" by Bob McNally

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Jethro Tull's first album from the late 1960s had a piece on it called "A Christmas Song," and the very lovely song been a mainstay of Tull's repertoire ever since. Here's a version from 2003:

Current Mood: tired tired
Current Music: "In Dulci Jubilo" by the Waverly Consort

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Nog unconvincingly channels Milo Minderbinder, Radar O'Reilly, and Max Klinger (not that Nog is unconvincing, but 24th-century engineers shouldn't need to scrounge for parts), while Odo has to deal with not one, but two Weyouns, the poor bastard. The DS9 Rewatch deals with "Treachery, Faith, and the Great River."

An excerpt:
O’Brien reports to Ops to discover that Sisko’s desk has gone missing—and O’Brien’s authorization code (which he gave to Nog) is on the order. Kira tells O’Brien that the desk better be back when Sisko returns in two days. Nog explains to an annoyed O’Brien that he just loaned the desk to Chief Lorenzo of Decos Prime. Lorenzo collects holophotos of himself sitting behind the desks of Starfleet captains (his collection includes DeSoto and Picard). In exchange, Lorenzo will get them an induction modulator, which Nog can trade to the Musashi for a phaser emitter, which the Sentinel needs—and they have the graviton stabilizer the Defiant needs. Cha cha cha.

Current Mood: tired tired
Current Music: "Another Christmas Song" by Jethro Tull

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Weird kind of up-and-down day today. I just finished watching "Treachery, Faith, and the Great River," a truly delightful seventh-season DS9 episode for tomorrow's rewatch. But I was delayed in starting it because I got some spectacularly shitty news that a tie-in project that I was involved with isn't going to happen for me. On the one hand, the project was a long shot on several levels; on the other hand, it would've been a fantastic project to do, with the added bonus of being very remunerative.

However, no sense crying over spilt milk, not when there are other bottles of the white stuff just waiting for me to break them. The same conversation that revealed that this project was kaputzki for me also provided two other possibilities -- they're only possibilities right now, and are just as likely as not to come to nothing, but an opportunity is better than no opportunity, if you know what I mean.

It wouldn't bug me so much except for the fact that Wrenn is still out of work. She's been getting lots of contact from headhunters, but every opportunity -- for jobs that she's 100% qualified for -- has fizzled out. It's frustrating. Between the (crappy-paying) editorial work she's doing and my writing, editing, and karate teaching gigs, we're managing to pay the bills, just barely, but there are so many things we can't do right now (basically: anything fun, unless it's free) that's it's incredibly disheartening and depressing.

Mind you, we could be a lot worse off. We have friends, we have family, we do have some money coming in, we have very kind landlords who have been very forgiving of the scattershot method by which we pay rent, and thanks to the ACA we have health insurance, so our health is being actually managed.

But it's also incredibly frustrating to have to put all my writing plans on hold because I have to pursue the immediate here-and-now paycheck of tie-in work. And it's not like people are banging down my door for that, either. There's one project that could be pretty big, but it's been "in the works" for over a year now with very little to show for it, and that's in the I'll-believe-it-when-I-see-it stage. Certainly it's not anything I can count on. Meanwhile, I've got more than half a dozen different notions for original fiction burbling in my brain (one mystery, two different urban fantasies, two science fiction, one historicalish, one epic fantasy), but I can't afford to carve out the three-to-four months (at least) that I'd need to write each of them. Hell, I don't even know when I'm going to be able to write Mermaid Precinct......

However, it's not all bad. I've got a Stargate SG-1 novel to write, I've got another nifty project that should be approved soon-ish, I'm in negotiations with a company for something that will be incredibly cool (hoping to announce it once the paperwork is settled; the verbal haranguing has been done, it's just a matter of getting it all in writing), and KRADitorial is still chugging away (though I can always use more clients, cough cough).

Plus, I have wonderful wonderful wonderful fans. Seriously, you guys keep me going, so thanks for that. :)

So I will keep on keepin' on. Now, back to work.......................

Current Mood: cranky cranky
Current Music: "A Winter Snowscape" by Jethro Tull

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Trying to get back into doing this. Like most pop stars of the 1990s, Melissa Etheridge did an MTV Unplugged concert, and for one song she brought out someone to do a duet: Bruce Springsteen. The pair of them did a superb rendition of "Thunder Road."

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Thunder Road" by Melissa Etheridge & Bruce Springsteen

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Last week: Sisko's Academy rivalry gets the gang sucked into an improvised baseball game -- Fancy Dans, takeout slides, the infield fly rule, double plays, suicide squeezes, ejections, "Death to the opposition!" and manufactured triumphs. The DS9 Rewatch sings "Take Me Out to the Holosuite."

An excerpt:
Yes, it has its flaws. Yes, it’s a big ol’ cliché. Yes, the story beats are eminently predictable (though I like the fact that they not only don’t win but aren’t in the slightest danger of winning, as a hastily assembled baseball team would never stand a snowball’s chance in hell in these circumstances, and it’s to Ronald D. Moore’s credit that the Niners’ bravado about winning doesn’t last past the first pitch).


Today: The Jack Pack is back! Sarina speaks and sings! Bashir acts like a total douchenozzle! The DS9 Rewatch opens a "Chrysalis."

An excerpt:
But ultimately my biggest problem is that this story is only about Bashir when it should also be about Sarina. Yes, Bashir is a main character, but he’s being a jackass. His behavior is horrendous, bordering on unethical—he stops being her doctor, at the very least—but Sarina imprinting on him is almost inevitable, and his response should’ve been to back off, not double down. (Gee, if only they had a counselor on the station to help him through that. Oh, wait!) Sarina’s struggle, outlined all-too-quickly when she unloads on Bashir in the cargo bay, should have been the heart of the episode.

Current Mood: tired tired
Current Music: "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" by the Beatles

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Editor Jonathan Maberry has announced the pub date, title, and cover of the third volume of V-Wars, the shared-world anthology series of his creation. I had a story in the first volume from 2011, and the second volume, Blood and Fire, was just released a few months ago, and in March 2015 we'll have Volume 3, which will be called Night Terrors and have a story by me in it called "Streets of Fire."

Here's the cover:

vwars3


The anthology will be published by IDW Publishing, just like all the others, and will have not only stories by me and Jonathan, but also Larry Correia, John Everson, James A. Moore, Scott Nicholson, Weston Ochse, Marcus A. Pelegrimas, Jeremy Robinson, Hank Schwaeble, Scott Sigler, and Tim Waggoner.

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "The Boy in the Bubble" by Paul Simon

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So a bunch of people on Facebook have posted a link to a site called LittleThings.com, which posted a list called "20 Marvelous Things that Kids Today Will Never Experience."

The article is spectacular amounts of bullshit.

I really don't have patience with the human tendency summed up by two clichés: "It's not like the good old days" and "better days are coming." The assumption that everything is worse now than it has ever been at any point in the history of humanity, past or future. It's horseshit. Older adults have been complaining about how kids today suck, not like how we were since the dawn of time. I see my contemporaries in their 40s making the same complaints about 20 year olds that people in their 40s made 20 years ago about us. Nostalgia has always ruled the day, because we remember the good parts of what happened in the past and consign the bad to the dustbin of forgetfulness.

And this article is a prime example of that kind of nonsense. And it's hokum.

The 20 things that the poor, deprived youth of today will never get to experience are pretty much entirely things that have been replaced by things that are better in every measurable sense -- or don't belong on this list because they're still around.

1. Rotary phones. When I saw this atop the list, I had a bad feeling about the rest of it (which proved right). Seriously, rotary phones are, like, the worst thing ever in the history of things. It made the process of calling someone arduous and annoying, and far far far too easy to fuck up. The article praises how much harder it was to dial as if that's a good thing....

2. S&H Green Stamps. Quoth the article: "Grocery stores gave these out as part of a rewards program operated by the Sperry & Hutchinson company. There was nothing more exciting than getting one of these booklets!" All I can say is 1) I get circulars dropped on my front door that accomplish the same thing and 2) the person who wrote this article needs to get out more if the S&H booklet's arrival is the gold standard for excitement.....

3. Hot Rollers. Because sitting in a salon looking like one of the Coneheads is a vital experience missing from today's female youth. *rolleyes*

4. Encyclopedias. Since I started editing a line of eBooks at the turn of the millennium, I've gotten well and truly sick of the "tactile" crowd, who feel the need to attach a moral superiority to their preference of codex books over electronic ones. No, it's not enough to say, "I prefer paper," it has to be, "I prefer the nobility of paper and the joy of the glorious smell of an old book that truly provides the proper reading experience." But even those types agree that reference books are much better suited to the electronic or Internet format, since these are works that are not read in a linear fashion and which is rewarded by the ability to hyperlink and hop around. Plus, online search engines and wikis and such have done a great deal to curtail lengthy, stupid arguments that can be solved by a quick Google search. For that reason alone, being able to look something up easily from anywhere you have a phone or computer is better than having to make a trip to the library to look it up, and saying this is a loss to the world is stupid.

5. Fotomat. Anybody who thinks it's better to wait 24 hours to find out that all your pictures suck instead of finding out when you take it so you can take another one is too stupid to live. But apparently not too stupid to write dopey Internet articles......

6. Table trays. Now we have our first "why is this on the list?" item, because the article is things the youth of today will never experience, and table trays still exist. I have friends who use them! What's worse, the article itself says that they've "faded out of popularity," but they still exist. This violates the "never" in the article title.

7. Typewriters. Really? Really????

8. The Sears Big Book Catalog. This is one of the few where I'm willing to give a pass. Sears did magnificent catalogues that were way fun to page through. But online shopping is still better.....

9. Cootie. Supposedly the older version of this game I've never heard of is better than the newer version of this game I've never heard of. Let's call this a wash......

10. Old-fashioned hair dryers. You know, the big-ass ones that came in what looked like a hat box. No idea why these are more awesome than smaller, more powerful ones with more settings.

11. Drinking Lucky Bird. According to a Google search that took me less than ten seconds, these still exist and you can order them on Amazon. So wrong again, article! (They were probably confused because they didn't see it in the encyclopedia....)

12. American Bandstand. This is the one and only place where I agree wholeheartedly with the article, especially since AB isn't available on home video in any format. A treasure that is greatly missed and, unlike many of the other things on this list, its replacements aren't superior.

13. Fried McDonald's Cherry Pies. No. Just -- no.

14. Film strip canisters. The actual text accompanying this is, "Those black-and-white documentaries may have been a little dull, but they sure beat doing schoolwork. Seeing these on your teacher’s desk when you walked into class was always exciting, because it meant a good day of watching films ahead!" So it isn't really the canisters that they're talking about, but rather the films shown in class -- which are still shown in classes, they just use smartboards instead of filmstrip viewers.

15. Bread boxes. *looks at bread box in his kitchen* *thinks about bread boxes in parents' kitchen* *thinks about bread boxes he's seen in other homes* *shakes head*

16. Spinning tops. See answer to #11. Also still readily available.

17. Tan M&Ms. Because the youth of today is totally missing out on candy that's the same color as shit (which is the real reason why they discontinued it....).

18. Metal slinkies. "It just isn’t quite the same as the ones that got could get all rusty and possibly cut your fingers." The best they can come up with for metal's superiority to plastic is the possiblity of getting wounded? Seriously?

19. Metal playgrounds. Same argument as #18 -- less safe playgrounds are better! Now I admit, I think that the cult of "We must protect the precious children!" has gotten way out of hand, but I still think it's better for them to ride padded seesaws....

20. Being a Baby Boomer. In other words, "Hey, we couldn't come up with 20 items for our 20-item list -- hell, #18 and 19 are pretty much the same one. I know! Let's end it with a totally smug declaration of how much better people born shortly after World War II are than the rest of humanity!"


This is a stupid article. In case, y'know, that wasn't clear. And it promotes a tendency that is repugnant.

Current Mood: annoyed annoyed
Current Music: "Homeward Bound" by Simon & Garfunkel

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The Love, Romances, & More blog has reviewed Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution, and given it four hearts (out of a possible five).

Money quote:
It was engrossing, intriguing and quite enjoyable. I love the TV show so it was fun to read about aspects in between episodes that may have happened not shown on the television. This author does a great job in capturing the characters personalities and voices which I was thrilled about. They sounded just like on the show while I was reading the story, CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION and the author does a great job in crafting a great story to bridge 2 episodes from the first season. The story flows smoothly, alternating at times between past and present, the characters are quite well written and fairly leap off the pages and the mystery surrounding the task Ichabod is on left me anxious to know more with each page I turned.

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "Late in the Evening" by Paul Simon

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My last convention of 2014 will be DerpyCon 2014. This con started out (as you might guess from the name) as a My Little Pony con but -- just as Shore Leave has expanded beyond Star Trek and PortConMaine is expanding beyond anime -- DerpyCon is expanding its focus beyond MLP, and so have a bunch of author guests, including me, Danielle Ackley-McPhail, and Michael Hanson.

Most of the con I'll have a table out in one of the hallways selling my wares and signing books. However, I can also be found doing the following:

Friday
3-4pm: opening ceremonies, w/all the guests (main events room).

Saturday
4-5pm: practical self-defense workshop (panel room #5).

Sunday
11am-12pm: C.J. Henderson tribute, w/Danielle Ackley McPhail and Michael Hanson (panel room #1).

C.J. was supposed to be a guest of the con, and in fact it was through him that I learned of the con and first made contact with them about being a guest.

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Bridge Over Troubled Water" by Art Garfunkel

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My bio is now up on Dragon Con's web site. Guess I'm really going.....................

I'm especially proud of the abstract that's on the main guest page:
Keith R.A. DeCandido has written novels, comics, and short fiction in more than two dozen different licensed universes from Star Trek to Sleepy Hollow, as well as his original novels set in the fictional Cliff's End and the real-ish Key West. Learn more at www.DeCandido.net.

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Train in the Distance" by Paul Simon

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The Sci-Fi Chick has reviewed Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution, and she likes what she sees!

Money quote:
The author did an amazing job of fleshing out Crane and Abbie just as vivid as they are on screen. There is an impressive amount of historic research that blends well into a creative fantasy story. The mystery of the Congressional Cross thefts builds to a thrilling conclusion. I hope to see many more novels in this series, if they’re at this level of quality.

In addition, I stumbled across a site called "Mervi's Book Reviews," in which Mervi has reviewed my 2001 Farscape novel House of Cards, as well as the first four Farscape graphic novels, The Beginning of the End of the Beginning, Strange Detractors, Gone and Back, and Tangled Roots.

Money quote from the House of Cards review:
I liked this book a lot because the whole premise is fun and every character has some great scenes. Chiana and Rygel are very exited about the planet, the rest of the crew not so much. In fact, John thinks that it might make him homesick so he remains on Moya. But later he gets to work on actual science and he’s very exited about that. Rygel is really in his element here and the only reason he loses Moya is because he was cheated. But he can’t prove it. Chiana is also like a fish in water and she has a feeling that their passenger has been lying to them, and investigates. Aeryn has to pretend to be a Peacekeeper which brings back lots of bad old memories. And D’Argo gets to be a grumpy bodyguard, making snide comments to a self-absorbed singer. Eventually, they work well together to get out of the jam.

This is a fun little book and it could have been a light episode.

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes" by Paul Simon & Ladysmith Black Mambazo

who is this guy?
Keith R.A. DeCandido
User: kradical
Name: Keith R.A. DeCandido
Website: DeCandido.net
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