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KRAD's Inaccurate Guide to Life
ramblings from a mad fedora'd writer
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final table of contents for Without a License
Later this year, Dark Quest Books will be publishing Without a License: The Fantastic Worlds of Keith R.A. DeCandido, a collection of my short fiction. I've finalized the table of contents, and here's what's gonna be in it:

"Partners in Crime" (a new Dragon Precinct story written for this collection)
"The Ballad of Big Charlie" (originally published in V-Wars, part of the shared-world series created by Jonathan Maberry)
"A Vampire and a Vampire Hunter Walk Into a Bar" (originally published in Amazing Stories #608)
"Under the King's Bridge" (originally published in Liar Liar)
"The Stone of the First High Pontiff" (originally published in Defending the Future: Best-Laid Plans)
"Seven-Mile Race" (a new Cassie Zukav story written for this collection)
"Editorial Interference" (originally published in Fedoras Literary Review Volume 1, #2)
"Sunday in the Park with Spot" (originally published in Furry Fantastic)
"Wild Bill Got Shot" (previously unpublished, written as part of "Two Beers and a Story" at Noreascon in 2004)
"-30-" (originally published as part of the Viral novella series, created by Steven Savile)
"Behold a White Tricycle" (previously unpublished, written for the never-actually-published 44 Clowns: 11 Stories of the 4 Clowns of the Apocalypse anthology)

Not sure of the exact release date for this yet, but I'm looking at the possibility of throwing a release party for it at Arisia in January. We'll see.....

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Black Wings" by Tom Waits

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For the sixth time, I have not won the Scribe Award, in this case losing out on Best Original Non-Speculative Novel for Leverage: The Zoo Job to Greg Cox and Hy Conrad, who were tied for victory in that category. Greg had the other Leverage novel on the docket, The Bestseller Job, and Hy wrote Mr. Monk Helps Himself.

Dunno who the other winners were yet, but I'm sure they'll be available soon......

Current Mood: disappointed disappointed
Current Music: the "Absolute Power" episode of Stargate SG-1

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch: "Empok Nor"
O'Brien, Garak, Nog, and four redshirts go to DS9's sister station to scrounge for spare parts and find two psychotic Cardassians. Guess which four don't survive. Go on. Guess. The DS9 Rewatch travels to "Empok Nor."

An excerpt:
This is made worse by the climax, in which we’re supposed to believe that Garak, who has been sufficiently taken over by this psychotropic drug that he enjoys killing the first Cardassian soldier, gleefully pursues the second, and has no trouble whatsoever killing Amaro, will suddenly decide not to kill Nog. We’ve seen this before, notably in “The Adversary” and “Shattered Mirror,” where regulars are put in danger and survive it for no other reason than the actor has a contract to continue appearing on the show. Sure, it’s ostensibly in order to manipulate O’Brien, but this version of Garak doesn’t do manipulation, he’s a psychopath who wants to kill people a whole lot.

Current Mood: disappointed disappointed
Current Music: "Late in the Evening" by Paul Simon

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John Lee Hooker is the man. Period.

Current Mood: busy busy
Current Music: "One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer" by John Lee Hooker

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The Highland Library in Highland, New York (near Poughkeepsie) is holding their first-ever comic convention tomorrow from 10am to 4pm. I'm one of the guests, along with authors Linda Zimmerman and C.L. Schneider, comics writer Todd Dezago, cartoonist Roger L. Phillips, and makeup effects artist Danielle Masterson, as well as a dozen local cartoonists and various fan clubs. So come on by! I'll have a table, where I'll be selling and autographing books and answering whatever silly questions you might have for me.....

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Wake Up Little Susie" by Simon & Garfunkel

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Me and the late David Honigsberg at a solo gig of David's (with me backing him up on percussion) at the Baggot Inn, ca. 2001 or so.

Baggot1

Current Mood: nostalgic nostalgic
Current Music: the Yankees-Rangers game on YES

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch: "Blaze of Glory"
Eddington's back -- and he may be the only Maquis left... The DS9 Rewatch goes out in a "Blaze of Glory."

An excerpt:
In this episode, the final nail in the Maquis’s coffin is Eddington’s hubris. He never imagined that his plan to have the Maquis declare their independence and become a sovereign nation could have failed. He never imagined that the Cardassians would be strong enough to fight back. He never imagined having to deal with the Jem’Hadar or that if he did, that they would find Athos IV (given that he was DS9’s security chief going back to first contact with the Dominion, he really should have known better).

Current Mood: tired tired
Current Music: "Listen to the Music" by the Doobie Brothers

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The Chronic Rift In Review: I am the Master and you will obey me....
For the first time in waaaaaay too long, there's a new In Review episode of The Chronic Rift! Join me, John S. Drew, Krissy Myers, and Michael Falkner as we discuss John's shiny new Master's Degree, my new Dragon Precinct Kickstarter, the release of Scanners and Jodorowsky's Dune on DVD, and Michael's Doctor Whoblogging.

Plus reviews!
    "The Multiplex at the End of the Universe" -- Dan reviews Coherence as well as Star Trek in comic book and fan film form.
    "Pod People" -- John does a roundup of TV-related podcasts, including Mission Log: A Roddenberry Podcast, Bigger on the Inside, The M*A*S*H 4077 Podcast, The Quantum Leap Podcast, and The seaQuest Podcast.
    "Couch Potato Salad" -- I do a roundup of Dominion, Fargo, Justified, Rake, Killer Women, Murder in the First, and Sirens

And we close with "Pop Tops." Check it out!

The episode is available on iTunes or the Rift web site. Comments can be left at the Rift forums or the Rift Facebook page, via e-mail to john at chronicrift dot com, or by phone at 888-866-9010. Follow us on Twitter @chronic_rift.

Current Mood: geeky geeky
Current Music: "I Heard it Through the Grapevine" by Creedence Clearwater Revival

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excerpt from my Sleepy Hollow novel on Scribd!
The fine folks at Scribd have put up an excerpt from Chapter 1 of my forthcoming Sleepy Hollow novel Children of the Revolution. So go check it out and be teased!

And you can preorder the book from Amazon (Kindle or mass market), Barnes & Noble (Nook or mass market), or Indie Bound.

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Just Come Down for the Weekend" by Michael McCloud

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My dear friend Jenn is in town and I've been wandering the city with her since she got here. We've covered Penn Station, Katz's Deli, the Delancey, Central Park, and Professor Thom's, and yesterday we went to Coney Island, the New York Aquarium, and Lombardi's.

Wrenn and I were as much tourists at Coney Island as Jenn was, and we were lead around by our friends Emily and Paul, who live nearby. I hadn't been to CI since I was a wee tot (and neither Wrenn nor Jenn had ever been), and I'm really gratified to see how much the area has revived since its not-so-long-ago days as a run-down dump. Wrenn and I even rode on the Thunderbolt, which was great fun, and we revived our desire to some day go to an amusement park and spend the day on stomach-destroying roller-coaster rides. :)

After wandering the boardwalk, taking pictures, riding the carousel, and eating at Nathan's, Emily and Paul left us to the Aquarium, which is still being rebuilt following Sandy, but which has lots of neat stuff including two walruses (Jenn had never seen a walrus in person), penguins (whom we saw fed), and a superb sealion show.

Then we headed to Lombardi's, so Jenn could experience the first pizza place in NYC, and after Wrenn stopped at Rice to Riches for rice pudding, we went home and collapsed.

Today I'm taking her to the Brooklyn Bridge and South Street Seaport, and possibly Chinatown, then we're going to see my former Boogie Knights bandmate Heather Bagnall in SingleMarriedGirl at the Spiral Theatre.

Current Mood: awake awake
Current Music: "The Envoy" by Warren Zevon

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch: "Children of Time"
The crew of the Defiant meets their own descendants and has to figure out whether or not to kill them. Some hard choices as the DS9 Rewatch meets the "Children of Time."

An excerpt:
The discussion over what to do after Kira announces that she’s okay with sacrificing herself is an excellent one, the strongest of its type since the Prime Directive colloquy in Picard’s quarters in TNG’s “Pen Pals.” Everyone in the room has a legitimate point, the question isn’t as simple as Kira’s belief in destiny or O’Brien’s (completely understandable) rigidity, and the discussion is an excellent one.

Current Mood: tired tired
Current Music: "Half a Man" by the Austin Lounge Lizards

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Yesterday started with me going to the Chapin School on the upper east side of Manhattan, which is hosting the i2 summer camp, which is filled with intensive one-week workshops for kids on various subjects, and one of them is writing science fiction. I came in for 90 minutes yesterday to talk to one group of fifth and sixth graders so they could get the perspective of a working SF writer on the business and the craft and such. I did a lot of my usual spiels about writing, only slightly simplified for the audience (I'm used to dealing with kids that age at the dojo, and I've also found that talking to them like people rather than kids is more effective). It went swimmingly, and I'm doing it again for a group of seventh and eighth graders next week. Thanks to the mighty Jaym Gates and Marilyn Doerr for setting it up.)

After that, following a detour to check the PO box (which just had some junk mail, sigh), I went down to Quest Diagnostics to get my blood drained as part of my most recent physical to make sure that my thyroid and cholesterol are still under control from the meds and to make sure there's nothing else wrong with me. Then I got some desperately needed food, since I hadn't eaten all day (because I was having my blood drained), and generally hung out in the vicinity of Penn Station waiting for my friend Jenn's train to arrive. While doing so, I worked on a tie-in novel proposal, which I actually finished and turned in yesterday.

Jenn is in visiting from Virginia for a week. After I fed her some lunch, we headed home to drop off luggage and relax and for Jenn and Scooter to re-bond (everyone loves Scooter and Scooter loves everyone, and he's particularly fond of Jenn).

Then we hied down to the lower east side. First we had dinner at Katz's Deli. Jenn was last here at Passover, so the opportunity for a proper Jewish deli didn't present itself. After consuming yummy sandwiches and Dr. Brown's sodas, we went to the Delancey, which has a free burlesque show every Wednesday night. Our roommate Dale is a regular at this show, and Wrenn and I have gone along a couple times, and the three of us took Jenn down last night. There are three sets, bridged by a go-go dancer (last night the host was Runaround Sue and the go-go dancer was Lucille Ti Amore). They also do audience participation thingies, and I got drafted for one of them, in which each contestant gets down on their knees and has to drink a beer from between either Sue's or Lucille's legs. I got Lucille who is, uh, very short. The angle was all wrong, and I wound up with a lot of beer on my shirt.

Despite this, we had a grand old time, the dancers were excellent (though one performer had overdone the glitter just a tad), and I was all set to enter a wet t-shirt contest. Jenn and Sue also got to talking and realized they're both from the same city in Virginia. Because of course in a lower-east-side bar, you'd bump into someone from the same town four states away.....

So in summary: I guest-lecutred on writing to ten-year-olds, I got my blood drained, I welcomed a friend back to NYC, I wrote a novel proposal, I ate a yummy pastrami sandwich, and I got beer spilled on me by a go-go dancer.

How was your day? *laughs*

Today, Jenn and I are spending the day in Central Park, then we're off to meet Wrenn at the Tor.com sixth anniversary party at Professor Thom's on Second Avenue.

Current Mood: happy happy
Current Music: "Consider Me Gone" by Sting

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reminder: I've got a Kickstarter for a new Dragon Precinct story going....
.....and now it has a video! Click here for everything you ever wanted to know about this particular Kickstarter, which is for Danthres Tresyllione and Torin ban Wyvald's second case as detectives in the Cliff's End Castle Guard, and there's a video of me babbling about the project included now.

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Caravan" by Van Morrison & The Band

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch: "Soldiers of the Empire"
Martok goes on a rescue mission on a Klingon ship, Worf and Dax keep him company, and I get a couple of cool characters for my novels. The DS9 Rewatch sails with some "Soldiers of the Empire."

An excerpt:
Even if the rest of the episode was dreadful, I would unreservedly love this episode and watch it over and over again for one simple reason: I adore the character of Leskit and how magnificently he was played by David Graf. When the episode first aired, I thought of him as the John Munch of Klingons, referring to Richard Belzer’s cynical character on Homicide: Life on the Street (and later Law & Order: Special Victims Unit), and the whole episode is worth it for his snide commentary and his drunken rants.

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "All Over the World" by Arlo Guthrie

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Back in late June, I appeared as one of the readers at Singularity & Co.'s "Lust for Genre" reading series, in which authors read the work of other authors they admire. I read "The Devil Without Glasses," an Alfred Bester story that was left unpublished until 1997, after his death, in a short story collection called Virtual Unrealities, which I helped put together when I worked for Byron Preiss.

The reading was recorded by Michael Anderson, and here it is for your viewing and listening pleasure:



(Wish somebody had told me how ridiculous my hair looked being blown about by the fan........)

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Kick Start My Heart" by Alannah Myles

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What an exhausting weekend..................

It all started Friday morning, when Wrenn and I drove to Philadelphia. I was speaking in the evening before the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and we figured we'd take advantage of the opportunity to go visit Wrenn's uncle Jack, who is a retired teacher at LaSalle University. He's a Christian Brother, and he still does stuff for the CBs on campus even though he doesn't teach anymore. We went to a lovely lunch at a brewery, and it was nice to just sit and catch up with him on stuff. (We hadn't seen him since Christmas.)

Then we went from north Philly to south Philly, meeting Zan Rosin and a few other PSFSians at Marra's, a fantastic Italian restaurant on Passyunk Avenue. After a great dinner that couldn't be beat (I had penne in vodka sauce, which was superb), we went to the International House (part of the University of Pennsylvania) for my talk, which went very well. I read a bit from Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution, I pimped my upcoming projects, and I answered an impressively wide range of questions about my work.

Lots of people bought books afterward, which made me happy, and then we went to a dive called Abner's, where the food is mediocre, but they stay open all night, so several of us got to sit and gab for hours and hours. I had a great time sitting with Hugh Casey, Stephanie Lucas, and Lynati Kshudra. The former two are dear old friends whom I rarely get the chance to just sit and talk to (we usually see each other at conventions where we're all stupid busy), and Lynati is a delightful person whom I enjoyed getting to know.

Eventually, we hied out to Zan's place in the 'burbs to crash for the evening (having ice cream first, because ice cream is important). We slept in Saturday morning, though I had to get up at 10.30 to record a way-overdue in-review episode of The Chronic Rift. (Luckily, all I need for that is my tablet and a wireless network....) After breakfast and hanging-out with Zan, we drove through Philly to Maple Shade, New Jersey to spend some time with Wrenn's old friend Ian, then we hit the road home.

Saturday night was the "monthly" poker game (which we haven't actually played since February). That was nice, finally getting together with several good friends for a fun evening of cards and booze. I came out down on the evening, but not horribly so -- I won a few big hands, lost a few big hands, but never was in danger of crapping out, either.

I found out while on my way to poker that I was to be one of the people speaking a eulogy for C.J. Henderson at his funeral Sunday morning, so I was up until 3 working on that, then I slept for four whole hours before we got up, put on our grown-up clothes (well, mostly -- I wore a Silver Surfer tie because, well, C.J.), and headed to Brooklyn for the funeral.

It was a lovely service, filled to the brim with friends and family, and lots of delightful remembrances from many people. We did not join the procession to the crematorium, as we were both fried from the above-mentioned events, instead going home and collapsing in a heap. We both napped for several hours.....

Tonight I want to try to finish "Seven Mile Race," the Cassie Zukav story that will be in Without a License, and also eat pizza and veg out in front of the TV.

So how was your weekend?

Current Mood: exhausted exhausted
Current Music: "Locomotive Breath" by Jethro Tull

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Yesterday I got an e-mail from Danielle Ackley-McPhail saying that C.J. Henderson's widow, Tin, wanted to maek sure that there were people to stand up and say things about C.J. during the funeral this morning. I volunteered to be one of those people (along with Dani, John L. French, Jamie Chambers, Marc Cerasini, and various friends, family members, and close friends of C.J.).

Here's what I said:
I'm not sure when I first met C.J. Henderson, but it was probably at a convention, and I think he was trying to sell me a book. I look back over the past 20-plus years that I've been attending science fiction and comics conventions, and C.J. has always been there.

The thing that has stood out to me about C.J. is how he was first, last, and forever, a professional. He was always thinking about the next story, because there always was a next story. Whenever someone came to him with a writing gig, he said yes—and then figured out how he was going to accomplish it. And accomplish it, he almost always did. Because he was just that good.

But it wasn't just his work ethic—which was amazing—or how easy he was to work with—he understood the process well enough to be accommodating to the vicissitudes of the publishing industry—or the ridiculous number of different genres that he not only wrote in, but thrived in. What stood out about C.J. was his willingness to reach out to new and up-and-coming writers and give his time and advice. I can think of half-a-dozen writers off the top of my head—many of whom are in this room—who list C.J. as one of their mentors. He remembered all the people who helped him when he came up in the field, and wanted to continue to do for others what they did for him.

At LI-Con earlier this year, C.J. told the story of his first trip to New York. He walked into the offices of a publishing house and found an editor and asked him questions about how to become a writer. Because, apparently, nobody told him you weren't supposed to do that. That editor sat down and talked with him and gave him some advice that C.J. continued to follow and treasure.

Sadly, C.J. is not the only well-loved genre writer we lost to cancer this year. Jay Lake also lost his similar battle. I have no idea if Jay and C.J. knew each other, but I suspect they would have gotten along. After Jay died, a fellow writer told a wonderful story about how she was angsting about a project and not sure if it would work or if she could do it or if it would sell, and Jay just stared at her and said, "Screw that, just do it."

Those five words Jay said—well, okay, he used a word other than "screw"—pretty much sum C.J. up. He never worried about how to do something, he just did it.

That even extends to his lovely wife, Tin, to whom he was married for three decades. I remember when I heard him tell the story of how he saw her for the first time and decided right there that he was going to marry that woman. As always, he figured out the how later.

C.J. always was generally proud of his own accomplishments, but the only time I ever heard him speak with heartfelt pride was when he discussed Tin and their daughter Erica, whether it was the story of how he fell in love with Tin or of how he and Erica collaborated on Baby's First Mythos: Learning with Lovecraft.

I only got to work with C.J. a couple of times. Once he wrote a story for an anthology I was editing, and once I wrote a story for an anthology he was editing. But we always saw each other at conventions and—between his selling people lots of books—we'd always talk about all kinds of things. He was always jealous of the projects I worked on and I was always jealous of the projects he worked on. We mostly liked the same TV shows and movies, and I particularly remember his lengthy tirade on how awful The Amazing Spider-Man movie was.

He was a cynical S.O.B., and he was a curmudgeon of the highest order. Nobody could piss and moan the way C.J. could. But he was also a genuinely happy person mostly because he got to write all the time and go to conventions all the time and how cool was that? He was never afraid to be silly or ridiculous because life is too short to take it too seriously—as today's gathering is a horrid reminder. He was never afraid to be absurd.

And while he would do panels and Q&A's and such, the memory that we will all carry of C.J. at a science fiction or comics convention will always be him sitting behind a table piled high and deep with his books, selling them to an unsuspecting reading public by the sheer power of his determination and awesomeness. You didn't walk by C.J.'s table without being engaged by him, and it was very rare that he didn't get you to at least pick up one of the books, if not buy one or more of them.

I'm completely sure when I last saw C.J. Henderson. It was definitely at a convention, and I'm sure he tried to sell me a book. It was Balticon, held in a suburb of Baltimore over Memorial Day weekend. Traditionally at Balticon, Dark Quest Books—one of C.J.'s many many many publishers—has held a launch party. This year, the party's prime organizer, the mighty Danielle Ackley-McPhail, told a bunch of us in secret that it was also going to be a surprise party for C.J. and Tin. Memorial Day weekend was also C.J. and Tin's 30th wedding anniversary, and so Danielle surprised them with a cake and presents and cards and such. There was also an auction for which all the proceeds went to C.J.'s considerable medical bills.

But the high point of the evening was when C.J. asked for the microphone and for quiet, and he then turned to Tin and, in front of a room full of people all watching with anticipation, he sang Tony Bennett's "Because of You." Even though his body was ravaged with the cancer and with the chemotherapy, he belted the song out in a resounding voice, and it was quite possibly the most beautiful thing I've ever seen in my life. There wasn't a dry eye in the place when he was finished.

If I'm forced to have a last memory of C.J., I'm glad that's it, because it was C.J. in a nutshell: at a publishing party, at a convention, declaring his love for his wife, while singing something frivolous and delightful and silly.

Beating the cancer was the first time that he couldn't figure out how to accomplish the task he'd accepted, and we are all the poorer for no longer having C.J. in our lives, and the only consolation is that we did have him in our lives in the first place. Through the words he wrote, through the personality he displayed, through the warmth he expressed, he left the world a better place than it was when he arrived. And that's a legacy we all should aspire to.

Rest in peace, my friend.

Current Mood: exhausted exhausted
Current Music: "Jack in the Green" by Jethro Tull

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch: "Ferengi Love Songs"
Quark is depressed and goes home to his moogie, only to find Grand Nagus Zek hiding in his closet. Meanwhile, Rom and Leeta are getting married -- probably. The DS9 Rewatch sings some "Ferengi Love Songs."

An excerpt:
I mean, you know what you’re getting right there in the title and everything. And the actual love stories here are enough to make you want to throw up, y’know, a lot. Zek and Ishka’s mushy talk is particularly vomit-inducing, not aided by Wallace Shawn’s screech and Cecily Adams’s bellow. (The recasting is unfortunate here. The late Adams does the best she can, but Andrea Martin is an impossibly tough act to follow.) Rom and Leeta are only marginally better, and it mostly works because nobody says “Aw!” more adorably than Chase Masterson and Max Grodénchik cries exactly like the Cowardly Lion in The Wizard of Oz.

Current Mood: tired tired
Current Music: "Mother Goose" by Jethro Tull

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I FOUR YEARS OLD!!!!!!!!!!

Keith at four

Current Mood: amused amused
Current Music: "Heart of New York" by Art Garfunkel

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So my writing schedule is getting entertaining........

Right now, if all goes according to plan, I'll have a 50,000-word novel and two short stories all due in the general vicinity of Labor Day. I can't say what the novel is -- though I'm really going to enjoy writing it if it happens, and it's part of a new line of tie-ins that I'm going to, I think, have a lot to contribute to -- but the short stories are the X-Files and V-Wars tales.

I'm not going to get approval on the novel until the end of this month, so the rest of July is going to be spent working on Without a License, my short story collection: finishing the new Cassie Zukav story for the collection, "Seven-Mile Race," revising the new Dragon Precinct story for same, "Partners in Crime," writing introductions for the stories, and figuring out what order to put the stories.

After that's done, I need to get the XF and VW stories done before diving into the tie-in novel. Busy busy....

Current Mood: awake awake
Current Music: "Inside of Me" by Little Steven & the Disciples of Soul

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Back in college, I discovered a local trio called the Washington Squares. I honestly don't remember if I was first exposed to them on Vin Scelsa's radio show "Idiot's Delight" (on WXRK at the time, still running on WFUV), or if it was when they played a concert at Fordham when I attended. I know I saw them at Fordham, but I can't remember if I was a fan of theirs already. In any case, they were a sort of neo-beatnik group but with lots of post-punk Reagan-era cynicism that played throughout the 1980s, breaking up in 1994 when one of the band members died. Here's their cover of Hoyt Axton's "Greenback Dollar" from a 1987 concert in Maine.

Current Mood: awake awake
Current Music: "Baba O'Riley" by Roger Daltry & the Chieftains

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch: "Ties of Blood and Water"
Kira has herself some serious-ass Daddy issues, as her father figure (Ghemor) returns to the station to die, which reminds her of when her actual father died. Bonus: Weyoun's back! The DS9 Rewatch makes some "Ties of Blood and Water."

An excerpt:
This is the first look at the Weyoun/Cardassian-in-charge dynamic that we’ll see a lot of for the rest of the series, first with Weyoun and Dukat and later with Weyoun and Damar, and what’s particularly fascinating about the former here is that there’s such an obvious difference between their two approaches to all of this. Dukat has everything invested in this—he wants to restore Cardassia to its former glory, going so far as to keep the title he had during Cardassia’s glory days, and insisting on Cardassia’s autonomy even as a Jem’Hadar stands behind him on his shiny new battleship and Weyoun’s there to keep an eye on him. For his part, Weyoun seems to just be enjoying himself, but also doesn’t seem to give all that much of a damn. The intrigue and plotting is an intellectual curiosity at best, but doesn’t really have a helluva lot to do with anything important. Being cloned isn’t the only reason why Weyoun is always left standing...

Current Mood: pleased pleased
Current Music: "Angels Don't Fall in Love" by the Bangles

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new Dragon Precinct story on Kickstarter -- Danthres & Torin's second case!
So I had so much fun writing "When the Magick Goes Away," the first case solved by the partner team of Torin ban Wyvald and Danthres Tresyllione from Dragon Precinct and its sequels, that I figured it was time to write a sequel that tells the story of their second case.

So, as with "WTMGA" (and, for that matter, "Gan Brightblade vs. Mitos the Mighty"), I'm going the crowdfunding route, and offering the story up on Kickstarter. For just two bucks, you'll get a copy of the story, which will show the growing pains of the Torin-and-Danthres partnership as they adjust to each other and to life as partners in solving the crimes of Cliff's End. For five bucks, you can get this and "WTMGA," and for nine bucks you can get all three of the Dragon Precinct Kickstarter stories. Plus there are other nifty rewards for more money......

So please! Go! Support!

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Current Music: "Evangelina" by Arlo Guthrie

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Much Ado for realsies this time
After the comedy of errors (ahem) that was our attempt to see Much Ado About Nothing at the Delacorte Theatre on Wednesday, we decided to take another shot at it on Sunday. I was having lunch with a friend out on Long Island, but Wrenn went ahead to the standby line around 1pm, and she was closer than we were on Wednesday when we were on that same standby line.

I joined her at 5, and we got to gang up on two French chicks who tried to cut the line (and tried to play innocent and snooty at the same time, something that only French people can actually pull off generally), and sure enough we got tickets! And there was no rain! Which was good, as Sunday was the closing performance....

The play was superb. More than worth the effort. I knew that Hamish Linklater and Lily Rabe played Benedick and Beatrice, respectively, but I didn't know that the Johns, Glover and Pankow, were playing, respectively, Leonato and Dogberry. Pankow (probably best known as Ira on Mad About You) was spectacular as Dogberry. I am second to none in my love for Nathan Fillion, who played the role in Joss Whedon's recent film adaptation, but Pankow blew him out of the water. (We will not discuss Michael Keaton's disastrous turn in the role in Kenneth Branagh's film.) As for Glover, he's never not brilliant.

Pedro Pascal, of Game of Thrones fame, had a lot of fun with Don John, basically diving full-tilt into his villainy. He pretty much wore a neon sign that said, "ASSHOLE!" and it worked, since the only reason the plot actually happens is because John is a shit, and I like the way Pascal just embraced it.

But the show was made by Linklater and Rabe. I first noticed both actors in Seminar on Broadway two years ago. I found myself wondering how the play would've been if the entire cast of the other show had been in it, with Jerry O'Connell as Don Pedro, Hetienne Park as Hiro, and Alan Rickman as either Leonato or Don John.

As seemingly always, the roles of Hiro and Claudio were spectacularly unmemorable. The next good Claudio and Hiro I see will be the first, honestly. Broadway musical star Brian Stokes Mitchell deserves kudos for playing Don Pedro, by far the toughest role in the play, as he has to be playful and mischievous and friendly and sympathetic, but he also has to come down on Claudio's side of villifying Hiro, without losing his sympathy as a good character in the story. It's a tough balancing act, but Mitchell managed it, aided by his powerful, deep voice.

This was a great production of a delightful play -- I love the fact that the day is saved by police work (not especially good police work, but still....) -- and I'm glad that after all our adventures we finally got to see it.....

Current Mood: sick sick
Current Music: "Badlands" by Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band

kradical
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Dead Kitchen Radio Episode 41: "Stone Cold Whodunit"
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Keith R.A. DeCandido
User: kradical
Name: Keith R.A. DeCandido
Website: DeCandido.net
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